American Woman Dies After Getting Plastic Surgery in the Dominican Republic

So why are passports and plastic surgery suddenly going hand in hand? Not surprisingly, lower costs are often the motivation. And in Medina’s case, it was also a matter of finding a doctor to perform the surgery; U.S. surgeons refused to operate on her until she lost weight. She found a doctor in the D.R. via social media who was willing to do it. “Weight is a definite factor in pre-operative risk assessment,” explains New York City plastic surgeon Dr. Melissa Doft. “Many doctors don’t want to perform elective surgery on a patient with a BMI greater than 30, and some will even cap it at 27 or 28.”  While that applies to any elective surgery, it’s paramount for lipo. You need to remove much more fat in an obese patient to see a noticeable difference, and large-volume liposuction has a higher risk of complications, such as blood clots and infections, she adds.

Read the full article on the RealSelf website at: American Woman Dies After Getting Plastic Surgery in the Dominican Republic

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